Electrical Drawings and Schematics

THE WORKSHOP

It is often said that drawing is engineers’ language. Drawings are used to communicate and share information between different teams of engineers; the design engineer who conceptualises an equipment or system, the production engineer who plans the steps in manufacturing the required components and subsystems, the assembly engineer who puts the components together, the testing engineer who tests the complete system, the installation engineer who installs the system or equipment and the maintenance engineer who is responsible for its upkeep. To all these engineers with diverse backgrounds and expertise, a drawing should convey precise and identical information. This calls for standardised methodologies, conventions and approach in preparing drawings. This workshop will cover all these aspects with respect to engineering drawings in general and electrical drawings in particular. Various types of electrical drawings and their application, the steps in planning a drawing, selection of drawing size and scale, use of standardised symbols etc will be described in detail with commonly used examples from industry practice.

Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) has brought about a major change in the way drawings are prepared and has caused a phenomenal improvement in drawing office productivity. No organisation can afford to use the older manual methods of preparing drawings today. Apart from reuse and easy modification of existing drawings to create new ones, complete or partial automated drawing preparation has also become a possibility. The workshop discusses the advances made in this field and the links between drawings and manufacturing using 3D visualisation tools and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) approach.

Use of CAD-CAM tools presents its own challenges in the way drawings are stored, shared between different groups of users and revised for reuse. The workshop also covers these aspects and takes a look at future possibilities in the way drawings will be used to disseminate information.

WHAT IS INCLUDED?

  • Receive a certificate of attendance in support of your continuing professional commitment
  • All workshops include the associated hardcopy technical manual
  • Printed workshop handouts
  • Lunch and refreshments
  • Interact and network with workshop attendees and experienced instructors
  • Practical, industry driven content to assist you in your continuing professional development (CPD)
  • Attendees automatically become IDC subscribers and receive exclusive deals and technical content every month

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  • Design engineers
  • Design technicians
  • Drawing office managers
  • Facility managers and technicians
  • Installation engineers
  • Maintenance engineers
  • Maintenance technicians
  • Manufacturing engineers
  • Project engineers
  • Testing engineers

CONTENT SUMMARY

ENGINEERING DRAWINGS - AN INTRODUCTION

  • Drawings – their relevance to engineering
  • Origin of worldwide standards in electro-technology
  • Purposes served by different types of drawings
  • Standards in a drawing office
  • Organisation of a typical drawing office
  • Printing and distribution – different options for making multiple copies

COMPONENTS OF A DRAWING, DRAWING SIZES AND SCALES

  • What is a typical engineering drawing made up of?
  • Various categories of electrical drawings
  • Planning a drawing
  • Sizes/arrangement
  • Single and multi-sheet drawings
  • Use of drawing scales
  • Multi-scale drawings
  • Title block in a drawing and what should a title block contain?
  • Legend block
  • Bill of materials block
  • Drawing notes block
  • Revision history, revision numbering and use of revision marks

SYMBOLS USED IN ELECTRO TECHNOLOGY AND GOVERNING STANDARDS

  • Which are the drawings that need symbols?
  • Symbols as per electro-technology standards – particularly IEC
  • Non-standard symbols – when and why?
  • Use of colours and line types in representing various services
  • Company standards for drawings – why?

SINGLE LINE AND 3-LINE DIAGRAMS

  • Purpose
  • Typical examples
  • Use of symbols
  • The differences between single-line and 3-line diagrams
  • Applications
  • Conventions used
    Practical exercises involving reading and interpretation of single line diagrams

SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS

  • Purpose
  • Typical examples
  • Use of symbols
  • Applications
  • Schematics spread over a number of sheets
  • Cross-referencing between coils and contacts
    Practical exercises involving reading and interpretation of schematic drawings

LOGIC DIAGRAMS

  • Purpose
  • Typical examples
  • Use of symbols
  • Applications
  • Logic diagrams spread over a number of sheets
  • Cross-referencing
    Practical exercises involving reading and interpretation of logic diagrams

CABLING AND WIRING DRAWINGS

  • Purpose
  • Typical examples
  • Sub types of cabling drawings
  • Cable layouts
  • Cable schedules
  • Tray/conduit schedules
  • Control cable interconnections
  • Panel internal wiring
  • Applications
  • Conventions used
    Practical exercises involving reading and interpretation of cabling drawings

LAYOUT DRAWINGS

  • Purpose
  • Typical examples
  • Sub types of layout drawings
  • Electrical room layouts
  • Lighting and lightning conductors layouts
  • Earthing layouts
  • Cabling layouts
  • Applications
  • Conventions used
    Practical exercises involving reading and interpretation of layout drawings

ADVANCES ARISING FROM COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING (CAD)

  • Drawing office revolution by CAD and the role of PC based CAD applications
  • 2-D and 3-D CAD applications and links to CAM
  • Drawing to true dimensions in CAD applications
  • Use of symbols, attributes and symbol libraries
  • Automated bill of material generation from a CAD drawing
  • Information sharing on multi-disciplinary drawings
  • Concept of layers and their use in sharing information
  • Automation of drawing through programming
  • Linking imagery with drawings – GIS related applications

MANAGEMENT OF DRAWINGS

  • Planning and assigning of drawings
  • Need for drawing numbering standards
  • Drawing process flow
  • Revision control and ownership of drawing
  • Comments and their marking
  • Drawing management system for work flow control
  • On-line distribution of drawings - the end of the era of paper drawings?
  • Drawing as a database for engineering and construction – the future

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