Emergency Power Supplies: Electrical Distribution Design, Installation and Commissioning

THE WORKSHOP

Power is becoming a commodity that can no longer be taken for granted. On the other hand, our dependence on electricity is growing and even a few hours of power disruption has become unthinkable. An unscheduled interruption can cause immense damage besides accidents and loss of life.

While it is impossible to guarantee 100% availability of power at all points in any system, vulnerable sections can be provided with alternative emergency power supply to ensure more reliable power availability, thereby avoiding the problems of power interruption.

The objective of this workshop is to teach the basic facts about ensuring reliable power supply to critical systems using various available options. The solutions can vary from the simple diesel generating set as standby sources to superconducting energy sag support systems. Also, newer technologies like fuel cells are now available and are fast becoming mainstream solutions.

Of course, all this comes at a price, which means that the solution must match the actual needs without excessive insurance and thereby optimise investments. This workshop will discuss how to save dollars by finding the right solution to your needs so that you invest just what is needed and where it is needed.

This workshop will also briefly look at the design issues involved in planning the distribution of emergency power.

WHAT IS INCLUDED?

  • Receive a certificate of attendance in support of your continuing professional commitment
  • All workshops include the associated hardcopy technical manual
  • Printed workshop handouts
  • Lunch and refreshments
  • Interact and network with workshop attendees and experienced instructors
  • Practical, industry driven content to assist you in your continuing professional development (CPD)
  • Attendees automatically become IDC subscribers and receive exclusive deals and technical content every month

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  • Building service designers
  • Electrical engineers
  • Maintenance engineers
  • Power system protection and control engineers
  • Project engineers
  • Systems planners and managers

CONTENT SUMMARY

POWER QUALITY

  • Electrical parameters
  • What is power quality?
  • Problems - effects and mitigation
  • Reliability
  • Available solutions and making the right choices

VOLTAGE VARIATIONS

  • Voltage amplitude
  • Voltage sag and its effects
  • Equipment sensitivity
  • Control measures
  • Voltage improvements, fluctuations and flicker

CONTINUITY OF POWER

  • Power failure
  • Needs of equipment
  • Understanding failures
  • Interruptions and voltage/frequency excursions
  • Uninterrupted, emergency and standby power
  • Redundancy and automation

DIESEL TECHNOLOGY AND CLASSIFICATIONS

  • Basic engine processes
  • Reciprocating engines
  • Spark ignition engines
  • Diesel and dual fuel engines
  • Speed and service classifications

BASIC ENGINE DESIGN AND RATINGS

  • Design characteristics and formulas
  • Turbo charger
  • Ambient conditions
  • ISO ratings
  • Performance and efficiency
  • Engine speed
  • Fuel combustion methods

CONVENTIONAL UNINTERRUPTED POWER SUPPLY

  • Main classification
    • Rotary and static
  • Rotary, advanced and hybrid UPS systems

STATIC UPS SYSTEMS

  • Configuration
  • Types of static UPS systems
  • UPS metering, indications, alarms and protection
  • Power quality and UPS
  • UPS configurations
  • Redundant UPS configuration and building high reliability power supplies

NEW TECHNOLOGIES

  • Problems in existing technologies
  • Maintenance issues on prolonged operation
  • Environmental problems
  • Fuel cell
  • Micro turbine

FUEL CELL

  • Historical perspective
  • Operating principle
  • Types of cells available and comparison
  • Fuel cell system for backup power-overview
  • Comparison with battery powered UPS
  • Case study

MICRO TURBINE

  • Conventional gas turbine power plant
  • Efficiency issues and combined cycle power generation
  • Comparison of micro turbines with conventional turbines
  • Typical micro turbine based standby power unit
  • Case study involving critical process application

CONFIGURING POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR EMERGENCY LOADS

  • Integrating emergency and critical power needs in the distribution network
  • Multiple units nearer the consumer vs. larger centralised units
  • Paying attention to motor starting requirements and accompanying voltage sag
  • Typical distribution scenarios in large industrial systems for integration of emergency power
  • Automation of starting, load changeover and shutdown

PARALLEL OPERATION AND TIE PROTECTION

  • Parallel operation between emergency sources
  • Load sharing between sources
  • Parallel operation of emergency source with normal source
  • Utility stipulations and local codes
  • Issue of tie-line separation
  • Static transfer switch and its application in critical power installations

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