Practical HAZOPS for Engineers & Technicians

THE WORKSHOP

The workshop provides training in the techniques of hazard and operability studies that are widely used in industry for the identification of potential hazards in process plant operations.

In recent years HAZOP methods have been extended to searching for hazards in operational procedures and in many other fields including electronic controls and emergency planning procedures. HAZOP can be adapted to a wide range of applications to seek out operational failure modes and possible harm to persons, environment or assets.

The workshop demonstrates the relationship (and differences) between HAZOP and other risk management techniques such as HAZID, Hazard Analysis, FMEA, fault tree analysis and the Safety Integrity Levels (SIL) of instrumented systems.

In process plant design it includes the identification and effect of failures in process control systems and SCADA systems. An example of CHAZOP (Control System HAZOP) is discussed that considers hazards arising from failures in control systems.

A number of practical exercises support the training information and allow participants to test their understanding of the material provided in the training manual.

Hazard studies interact closely with process design and safety engineering solutions in the critical stages of engineering projects. Understanding these interactions assists engineers and technicians to plan their work efficiently and to contribute effectively to the reduction of risks in the workplace. This workshop shows how information flow from HAZOP supports safety management throughout the life cycle of the plant.

WHAT IS INCLUDED?

  • Receive a certificate of attendance in support of your continuing professional commitment
  • All workshops include the associated hardcopy technical manual
  • Printed workshop handouts
  • Lunch and refreshments
  • Interact and network with workshop attendees and experienced instructors
  • Practical, industry driven content to assist you in your continuing professional development (CPD)
  • Attendees automatically become IDC subscribers and receive exclusive deals and technical content every month

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  • Commissioning engineers, plant supervisors and process maintenance technicians
  • Instrument and electrical engineers, process control engineers and system integrators who are likely to be participants in HAZOP or who will be asked to engineer safety control systems
  • Plant managers, project managers and planners seeking an awareness of the role of HAZOP in overall safety management
  • Process engineers, plant engineers, technicians and supervisors involved in new projects or in the modification or upgrading of existing plants
  • Loss prevention officers
  • Trainee HAZOP team leaders

CONTENT SUMMARY

REGISTRATION AND INTRODUCTION

  • Workshop outline and objectives
  • References to guides and standards
  • Glossary of terms

INTRODUCTION TO HAZOP

  • Outline of HAZOP method
  • Scope of study
  • Timing and purposes  

HAZARD STUDIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT

  • The need for quality assurance in hazard studies
  • The process hazard study lifecycle and the 6 levels of studies
  • Principles of risk management
  • Legal requirements for hazard studies, US and EU regulatory frameworks

TYPICAL HAZOP WORKSHOP

Step by step introduction to the activities of a HAZOP workshop

  • Timing and duration of the study
  • Documents required
  • Team membership and duties
  • Outline of the examination phase
  • Recording, reporting and follow up

EXAMINATION PHASE METHODS

  • Defining the system and selecting the parts for study
  • Elements and parameters
  • Generating deviations with guidewords and a matrix
  • Guideword examination procedures and responses
  • Worked examples of continuous and batch process studies
  • Control HAZOPS
  • Software tools for the examination and reporting phases

PLANNING AND LEADERSHIP OF HAZOPS

  • Organising the study, planning, scoping and objectives
  • The team leader’s skills and duties
  • Essential members of the team and their roles
  • Conducting the study sessions, dealing with problems
  • Using additional checklists for operability
  • Contents of the HAZOP study report
  • Tips for the facilitator

FROM HAZOPS TO SIL

  • The relationship between hazard studies and safety instrumented systems
  • Risk reduction concepts and the risk matrix
  • Concepts of tolerable risk and the ALARP principle
  • Layers of protection
  • The role of safety instrumented systems in risk reduction
  • The meaning of SIL and how it relates to safety and cost
  • SIL determination methods and the input from HAZOPS

HAZARD ANALYSIS METHODS

  • The reasons for hazard analysis
  • Failure modes and effect analysis method
  • Fault tree and event tree analysis methods
  • Adding risk reduction measures to the fault tree

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